Statistics jokes are average.

Statistics jokes are average.

(Source: mathlover1530, via sciencejokes)

currentsinbiology:

High-performance micropumps for lab-on-a-chip disease diagnosis
Researchers at Penn State have demonstrated an acoustofluidic pump powered by a piezoelectric transducer about the size of a quarter. This reliable, inexpensive, programmable pump is a crucial feature for lab-on-a-chip devices that could make the diagnosis of many global life-threatening diseases easy and affordable.

“The field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies has the potential to revolutionize the healthcare industry with cost-effective, high-performance miniature biomedical diagnostic devices. Despite its tremendous potential, the field has only delivered very limited numbers of products and tools for real-world applications. One of the reasons is that it is difficult to fabricate micropumps that are simple and inexpensive, yet reliable and effective,” said Tony Huang, professor of engineering science and mechanics in Penn State’s College of Engineering.

Po-Hsun Huang, Nitesh Nama, Zhangming Mao, Peng Li, Joseph Rufo, Yuchao Chen, Yuliang Xie, Cheng-Hsin Wei, Lin Wang and Tony Jun Huang. A reliable and programmable acoustofluidic pump powered by oscillating sharp-edge structures. Lab on a Chip, September, 2014 DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00806E
An acoustically powered pumping device with 250 micron long oscillating structures driven by a piezoelectric transducer mounted on a glass slide. Credit: Po-Hsun Huang and Tony Jun Huang, Penn State

currentsinbiology:

High-performance micropumps for lab-on-a-chip disease diagnosis

Researchers at Penn State have demonstrated an acoustofluidic pump powered by a piezoelectric transducer about the size of a quarter. This reliable, inexpensive, programmable pump is a crucial feature for lab-on-a-chip devices that could make the diagnosis of many global life-threatening diseases easy and affordable.

“The field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies has the potential to revolutionize the healthcare industry with cost-effective, high-performance miniature biomedical diagnostic devices. Despite its tremendous potential, the field has only delivered very limited numbers of products and tools for real-world applications. One of the reasons is that it is difficult to fabricate micropumps that are simple and inexpensive, yet reliable and effective,” said Tony Huang, professor of engineering science and mechanics in Penn State’s College of Engineering.

Po-Hsun Huang, Nitesh Nama, Zhangming Mao, Peng Li, Joseph Rufo, Yuchao Chen, Yuliang Xie, Cheng-Hsin Wei, Lin Wang and Tony Jun Huang. A reliable and programmable acoustofluidic pump powered by oscillating sharp-edge structures. Lab on a Chip, September, 2014 DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00806E

An acoustically powered pumping device with 250 micron long oscillating structures driven by a piezoelectric transducer mounted on a glass slide. Credit: Po-Hsun Huang and Tony Jun Huang, Penn State
Autoimmune disorders in a nutshell.

Autoimmune disorders in a nutshell.

(Source: sciencejokes)

A couple of months ago I signed up for the Windows Developer Program for the Internet of Things (IoT). All signs point to the fact, that Microsoft wants in the boom of the embedded devices such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi. This, I think, is excellent news for all makers and scientists, as it can mean more variety in hardware and software.

As part of my “welcome package” Microsoft was nice enough to send me an Intel Galileo board with accessories and with the new Windows for embedded devices pre-loaded. Awesome! Very excited to use it in the lab soon. Haven’t had the time to test it in practice yet, but will surely update on my first impressions.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

I suspect this is not actually active vibration control, but open loop control input shaping. I do not see the sensors for the liquid levels (though could be there) and would be slightly impractical for an automated assembly line. So what is done here is that the positioning motor gets an input which is “shaped” to prevent the liquid from moving around too much.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

I suspect this is not actually active vibration control, but open loop control input shaping. I do not see the sensors for the liquid levels (though could be there) and would be slightly impractical for an automated assembly line. So what is done here is that the positioning motor gets an input which is “shaped” to prevent the liquid from moving around too much.