txchnologist:

University of Minnesota engineers demonstrated the power of moving water during the USA Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in April. Their presentation showed visitors that submerged turbines in the path of flowing water can generate electricity.

The method is called hydrokinetic power generation, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission reports there are a number of projects operating or coming online in the future. As of April 22, the agency lists 16 marine and inland projects around the US with pending preliminary permits that potentially offer 3,969 megawatts of renewable electricity.

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Origin of common symbols.

(Source: beben-eleben, via visions-of-winter)

My colleague Filip is testing the power supply for a Schunk industrial robotic arm.

My colleague Filip is testing the power supply for a Schunk industrial robotic arm.

I always thought “vaio” was such a weird brand name, but what do you know. The first part represents analog signals, by assuming a form of a wave. Also, the first two letters can be “v” as in Volt and “a” as in Amperes, the physical units of electric potential and current. Cleverly, the dot can also symbolize the product of the two, that is electric power. The second part is “io” as in input and output, representing digital signals. Clever Sony, very clever.

I always thought “vaio” was such a weird brand name, but what do you know. The first part represents analog signals, by assuming a form of a wave. Also, the first two letters can be “v” as in Volt and “a” as in Amperes, the physical units of electric potential and current. Cleverly, the dot can also symbolize the product of the two, that is electric power. The second part is “io” as in input and output, representing digital signals.

Clever Sony, very clever.

(Source: spawnxiii, via alacritr)

Wall of dials on a control panel at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. These dials once indicated the levels of individual control rods within the reactor.

Wall of dials on a control panel at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. These dials once indicated the levels of individual control rods within the reactor.

(Source: allartnews.com, via lo-phi)