A couple of months ago I signed up for the Windows Developer Program for the Internet of Things (IoT). All signs point to the fact, that Microsoft wants in the boom of the embedded devices such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi. This, I think, is excellent news for all makers and scientists, as it can mean more variety in hardware and software.

As part of my “welcome package” Microsoft was nice enough to send me an Intel Galileo board with accessories and with the new Windows for embedded devices pre-loaded. Awesome! Very excited to use it in the lab soon. Haven’t had the time to test it in practice yet, but will surely update on my first impressions.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

I suspect this is not actually active vibration control, but open loop control input shaping. I do not see the sensors for the liquid levels (though could be there) and would be slightly impractical for an automated assembly line. So what is done here is that the positioning motor gets an input which is “shaped” to prevent the liquid from moving around too much.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

I suspect this is not actually active vibration control, but open loop control input shaping. I do not see the sensors for the liquid levels (though could be there) and would be slightly impractical for an automated assembly line. So what is done here is that the positioning motor gets an input which is “shaped” to prevent the liquid from moving around too much.

The 7th Forum Acusticum 2014 in Krakow has ended, here are some pictures from my talk. Also, I am happy to announce that I had the honor to receive the European Acoustics Association (EAA) Best paper and presentation award for young researchers.

harvardseas:

This soft, squishy robot can survive fire and ice. Click through to read about it and watch it in action.

powerproductiion:

Pratt & Whitney F100

powerproductiion:

Pratt & Whitney F100