asapscience:

Excellent advice from (arguably) the coolest physicist to have ever lived, Richard Feynman: you don’t have to be a genius to want to study science, you just have to work hard!
Edit: just realized the initial quote reads: “ordinary” rather than “normal” — our apologies for the screw up! 
Photo via Vice, quote via whats-out-there

asapscience:

Excellent advice from (arguably) the coolest physicist to have ever lived, Richard Feynman: you don’t have to be a genius to want to study science, you just have to work hard!

Edit: just realized the initial quote reads: “ordinary” rather than “normal” — our apologies for the screw up! 

Photo via Vice, quote via whats-out-there

World’s largest earthquake damper

A tuned mass damper, also known as a harmonic absorber, is a device mounted in structures to reduce the amplitude of mechanical vibrations. Their application can prevent discomfort, damage, or outright structural failure. They are frequently used in power transmission, automobiles, and buildings.(source:Wikipedia)

This 728 tons steel pendulum is installed in one of the world’s tallest buildings, the taipei 101 in Taiwan. It helps stabilize the building in case of strong winds and earthquakes, through simple mechanics, when the building moves in a direction it swings in the opposite direction reducing movement by 40%. You can understand how it works by looking at the small GIF image.

It cost $4 million to install the huge damper in the skyscraper but architects and engineers said it had to be done. It spans across 4 of the building’s stories and it was assembled on site because it couldn’t be lifted by a crane, due to its enormous weight.

Here’s a video of the damper in action, on May 12th,2008, when a horrific earthquake hit one of China’s provinces and the tremors reached as gar as Taipei. As the building started to shake, people ran towards the center to see the damper in action, it did it’s job.

(Source: odditycentral.com, via civilengineeringworld)

fanmixco:

In 1958, Jack Kilby demonstrated the first integrated circuit (this is considered an IEEE milestone). Since then, microchip performance has followed the observations of Moore’s law. What that means is today’s chips are 4.3 billion times more powerful than Kilby’s first revolutionary circuit.

fanmixco:

In 1958, Jack Kilby demonstrated the first integrated circuit (this is considered an IEEE milestone). Since then, microchip performance has followed the observations of Moore’s law. What that means is today’s chips are 4.3 billion times more powerful than Kilby’s first revolutionary circuit.

engineeringhistory:

Sony Flat TV, FD-200, introduced in 1980s

engineeringhistory:

Sony Flat TV, FD-200, introduced in 1980s

Science “journalism” is why we can’t have nice things.

Science “journalism” is why we can’t have nice things.

(via divineirony)