scanzen:

Pre-PET Headgear (Positron Emission Tomography)
In 1961, chemists at brookhavenlab studied how to detect small brain tumors by analyzing the decay of radioactive material injected into the patient’s bloodstream and preferentially absorbed by the tumor. To help them, BNL’s Instrumentation Division built different arrays of detectors, and this circular type proved best. In the 1970’s, BNL helped reconstruct the raw data received by the detectors into an image of the working brain. This breakthrough led to more practical devices for imaging areas of the brain: today’s PET machines. Today, Brookhaven is a leader in addiction research. BNL scientists use PET technology to study major areas of medical research including, drug and alcohol addiction; the development of a new strategy for addiction treatment; obesity and eating disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); aging and neurodegenerative disorders.
via Brookhaven National Laboratory

scanzen:

Pre-PET Headgear (Positron Emission Tomography)

In 1961, chemists at brookhavenlab studied how to detect small brain tumors by analyzing the decay of radioactive material injected into the patient’s bloodstream and preferentially absorbed by the tumor. To help them, BNL’s Instrumentation Division built different arrays of detectors, and this circular type proved best. In the 1970’s, BNL helped reconstruct the raw data received by the detectors into an image of the working brain. This breakthrough led to more practical devices for imaging areas of the brain: today’s PET machines. Today, Brookhaven is a leader in addiction research. BNL scientists use PET technology to study major areas of medical research including, drug and alcohol addiction; the development of a new strategy for addiction treatment; obesity and eating disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

via Brookhaven National Laboratory

Your average drug dealer might have more common with junior academic staff than you think. At least job security wise…

The academic job market is structured in many respects like a drug gang, with an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core  of insiders. […] what you have is an increasing number of PhD graduates arriving every year into the market hoping to secure a permanent position as a professor and enjoying freedom and – reasonably – high salaries, a bit like the rank-and-file drug dealer  hoping to become a drug lord. To achieve that, they are ready to forgo the income and security that they could have in other areas of employment by accepting insecure working conditions in the hope of securing jobs that are not expanding at the same rate. Because of the increasing inflow of potential outsiders ready to accept this kind of working conditions, this allows insiders to outsource a number of their tasks onto them, especially teaching, in a  context where there are increasing pressures for research and publishing.

Read the full article by Alexandre Afonso.
(via Aisi Li / Facebook)

Your average drug dealer might have more common with junior academic staff than you think. At least job security wise…

The academic job market is structured in many respects like a drug gang, with an expanding mass of outsiders and a shrinking core  of insiders. […] what you have is an increasing number of PhD graduates arriving every year into the market hoping to secure a permanent position as a professor and enjoying freedom and – reasonably – high salaries, a bit like the rank-and-file drug dealer  hoping to become a drug lord. To achieve that, they are ready to forgo the income and security that they could have in other areas of employment by accepting insecure working conditions in the hope of securing jobs that are not expanding at the same rate. Because of the increasing inflow of potential outsiders ready to accept this kind of working conditions, this allows insiders to outsource a number of their tasks onto them, especially teaching, in a  context where there are increasing pressures for research and publishing.

Read the full article by Alexandre Afonso.

(via Aisi Li / Facebook)

coolsciencegifs:

See-through skin
A ‘vein-viewer' works by using infrared light to image the presence of veins underneath the skin: The IR light is absorbed by the deoxygenated haemoglobin within veins. The locations of absorption and reflection are detected and the machine generates a corresponding projection using visible light. Find out more about how these devices are used in medicine in this video: http://youtu.be/lk0HMqwreIo
(via @rossexton)

coolsciencegifs:

See-through skin

A ‘vein-viewer' works by using infrared light to image the presence of veins underneath the skin: The IR light is absorbed by the deoxygenated haemoglobin within veins. The locations of absorption and reflection are detected and the machine generates a corresponding projection using visible light. Find out more about how these devices are used in medicine in this video: http://youtu.be/lk0HMqwreIo

(via @rossexton)

vintageeveryday:

High frequency electric currents in medicine and dentistry, 1910. See more photos here…

A Czechoslovak-made industrial robot from the 80’s. It is equipped with an old-school cassette-tape player running its instructions program. It is still functional too!

(National Robotics Center, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava)